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Ablene Interactions

Medications That May Interact with Ablene.
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 Ablene Supplement Facts

 Serving Size:  3 Capsules
 Servings Per Container:  30



  Amount
Per Serving
Daily Value


   Vitamin A   (Acetate) 10,000 IU 200%   

   Vitamin C   (Ascorbic Acid) 75 mg  125%

   Vitamin D3 200 IU  50%

   Vitamin E   (dL Alpha Tocopheryl Acetate) 100 IU 333%

   Vitamin B1  (Thiamin Mononitrate) 12.5 mg 833%

   Vitamin B2   (Riboflavin) 12.5 mg 735%

   Vitamin B3   (Niacinamide) 50 mg 250%

   Vitamin B6   (Pyridoxine HCL) 12.5 mg 625%

   Folic Acid  400 mcg 100%

   Vitamin B12  (Cyanocobalamin) 200 mcg 3333%

   Biotin  10 mcg 3.3%

   Vitamin B5   (D-Calcium Pantothenate) 25 mg 250%

   Iron  (Sulfate, Fumarate) 25.01  mg 139%

   Iodine  (Kelp) 65  mcg 43%

   Magnesium   (Oxide, Gluconate) 3.601 mg 0.9%

   Zinc   (Sulfate) 30 mg 200%

   Copper    (Gluconate) 13 mg 6.5%

   Manganese   (Gluconate, Sulfate) 3 mg 150%



   Para-Aminobenzoic Acid  12 mg *

   Citrus Bioflavanoids  12.5 mg *

   Rutin  12.5 mg *

   Betain HCI   (Betaine HCL) 12.5 mg *

   Hesperidin  2.5 mg *

   Huperzine A Extract  0.5 mg *

   Choline   (Bitartrate) 0.08 mg *

   Inositol  0.13 mg *

   L-Glutamine  1000 mg *

   Cat's Claw  (bark) Uncaria Tomentosa 200 mg *

   Licorice  (root) Glycyrrhiza Glabra 100 mg *

   Olive Extract   (leaf) Alea Europea 50 mg *


Other Ingredients:  Gelatin, Rice Powder, Magnesium Stearate.
*Daily Value Not Established


 

 

Daily Dosage: Take one capsule one hour before each meal.  If an upset stomach occurs take each capsule immediately following meals.

 

Ablene Research:

Possible Interactions with: Vitamin A (Retinol)

 

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use vitamin A without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Antacids
One study suggests that the combination of vitamin A and antacids may be more effective than antacids alone in healing ulcers.

Birth Control Medications
Birth control medications increase the levels of vitamin A in women. Therefore, it may not be appropriate for women taking birth control medications to take vitamin A supplements. Again, this is something that should be discussed with a knowledgeable healthcare provider.

Blood thinning Medications, Anticoagulants
Long-term use of vitamin A or use of high doses may lead to an increased risk of bleeding for those taking blood-thinning medications, particularly warfarin. People taking this medication should notify a doctor before taking vitamin A supplements.

Cholesterol-lowering Medications
The cholesterol-lowering medications cholestyramine and colestipol (both known as bile acid sequestrants), may reduce the body's ability to absorb vitamin A.

Another class of cholesterol-lowering medications called HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors or statins (including atorvastatin, fluvastatin, and lovastatin, among others) may actually increase vitamin A levels in the blood.

Doxorubicin
Test tube studies suggest that vitamin A may enhance the action of doxorubicin, a medication used for cancer. Much more research is needed, however, to know whether this has any practical application for people.

Neomycin
This antibiotic may reduce vitamin A absorption, especially when delivered in large doses.

Omeprazole
Omeprazole (used for gastroesophageal reflux disease or "heart burn") may influence the absorption and effectiveness of beta-carotene supplements. It is not known whether this medication affects the absorption of beta-carotene from foods.

Weight Loss Products
Orlistat, a medication used for weight loss and olestra, a substance added to certain food products, are both intended to bind to fat and prevent the absorption of fat and the associated calories. Because of their effects on fat, orlistat and olestra may also prevent the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins such as vitamin A. Given this concern and possibility, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) now requires that vitamin A and other fat soluble vitamins (namely, D, E, and K) be added to food products containing olestra. How well vitamin A from such food products is absorbed and used by the body is not clear. In addition, physicians who prescribe orlistat add a multivitamin with fat soluble vitamins to the regimen.

Alcohol
Alcohol can enhance the toxic effects of vitamin A, presumably through its adverse effects on the liver. It is unwise to take vitamin A if you drink regularly.

 


Possible Interactions with: Vitamin C (Ascorbic Acid)

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use vitamin C supplements without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Aspirin and Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)
Very limited research suggests that vitamin C may protect the stomach and intestines against injury from NSAIDs such as ibuoprofen. On the other hand, high doses of vitamin C (equal to or greater than 500 mg per day) may raise the blood levels of aspirin and other acidic medications.

Acetominophen
Vitamin C may decrease excretion of acetaminophen (a medication sold over the counter for pain and headache) in the urine, which may increase blood levels of this medication.

Diuretics, Loop
Animal studies suggest that vitamin C may amplify the effects of furosemide, which belongs to a class of medications known as loop diuretics.

Beta-blockers for high blood pressure
Vitamin C may decrease the absorption of propranolol, a medication that belongs to a class known as beta-blockers used for high blood pressure and other heart-related conditions. If taking vitamin C and a beta-blocker, therefore, it is best to take them at different times of the day.

Cyclosporine
Cyclosporine, a medication used for the treatment of cancer, may reduce blood levels of vitamin C.

Nitrate Medications for heart disease
The combination of vitamin C with nitroglycerin, isosorbide dinitrate, or isosorbide mononitrate reduces the occurrence of nitrate tolerance. Nitrate tolerance is when the body builds up a tolerance to the medicine so that it no longer has its desired effect. People taking nitrate-containing medications generally follow a 12 hours on, 12 hours off schedule to avoid this tolerance. Studies suggest that taking vitamin C along with nitrate medications may reduce the development of this tolerance.

Tetracycline
There is some evidence that taking vitamin C with the antibiotic tetracycline may increase the levels of this medication.

Warfarin
There have been rare case reports of vitamin C interfering with the effectiveness of this blood thinning medication. In recent follow up studies, no such association has been found with doses of vitamin C up to 1,000 mg per day. Because of these much earlier reports, however, some conservative clinicians suggest not exceeding RDA values of vitamin C (see earlier section entitled How To Take It). Whether taking recommended dietary amounts or larger quantities of vitamin C, anyone on warfarin must have their bleeding time measured regularly and followed closely using a value called an INR, measured at your doctor's office. If you take this blood thinner, any time you make a change to your diet, medications, or supplements, you must notify your physician.


Possible Interactions with: Vitamin D

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use vitamin D supplements without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Vitamin D levels may be increased by the following medications:

  • Estrogen: Hormone replacement therapy with estrogen appears to increase vitamin D levels in the blood; this may have a beneficial effect on calcium and bone metabolism. In addition, use of vitamin D supplements in conjunction with estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) increases bone mass more than ERT alone. However, this benefit may be lost with the addition of progesterone.
  • Isoniazid (INH): INH, a medication used to treat tuberculosis, may raise blood levels of vitamin D.
  • Thiazide: Diuretics in this class (such as hydrochlorothiazide) increase the activity of vitamin D and can lead to inappropriately high calcium levels in the blood.

Vitamin D levels may be decreased, or its absorption may be reduced, by the following medications:

  • Antacids: Taking certain antacids for long periods of time may alter the levels, metabolism, and availability of vitamin D.
  • Calcium-channel blockers (such as verapamil): These medications are used to treat high blood pressure and heart conditions may decrease the production of vitamin D by the body.
  • Cholestyramine: This cholesterol-lowering medication, known as a bile acid sequestrant, interferes with the absorption of vitamin D (as well as other fat soluble vitamins).
  • Phenobarbital, phenytoin, and other anticonvulsant medications: These medications may accelerate the body's use of vitamin D.
  • Mineral oil also interferes with absorption.

In addition, Vitamin D may enhance the effects of doxorubicin, a medicine used to treat a variety of cancers. More research is needed.

Some clinicians recommend following calcium levels closely if vitamin D is taken with digoxin, a medication used to treat irregular heart rhythms. This is because vitamin D improves absorption of calcium. Calcium, in turn, can increase the likelihood of a toxic reaction from this medication.

Weight Loss Products
Orlistat, a medication used for weight loss and olestra, a substance added to certain food products, are both intended to bind to fat and prevent the absorption of fat and the associated calories. Because of their effects on fat, orlistat and olestra may also prevent the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins such as vitamin D. Given this concern and possibility, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) now requires that vitamin D and other fat soluble vitamins (namely, A, E, and K) be added to food products containing olestra. How well vitamin D from such food products is absorbed and used by the body is not clear. In addition, physicians who prescribe orlistat add a multivitamin with fat soluble vitamins to the regimen.

 


 

 

Possible Interactions with: Vitamin E

 

We are unaware of any interactions with this supplement.


 

Possible Interactions with: Vitamin B1

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use vitamin B1 without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Antibiotics, Tetracycline
Vitamin B1 should not be taken at the same time as the antibiotic tetracycline because it interferes with the absorption and effectiveness of this medication. Vitamin B1 either alone or in combination with other B vitamins should be taken at different times from tetracycline. (All vitamin B complex supplements act in this way and should therefore be taken at different times from tetracycline.)

Antidepressant Medications, Tricylic
Taking vitamin B1 supplements may improve treatment with antidepressants such as nortriptyline, especially in elderly patients. Other medications in this class of antidepressants include desimpramine and imipramine.

Chemotherapy
Although the significance is not entirely clear, laboratory studies suggest that thiamine may inhibit the anti-cancer activity of chemotherapy agents. How this will ultimately prove relevant to people is not known. However, it may be wise for people undergoing chemotherapy for cancer to not take large doses of vitamin B1 supplements.

Digoxin
Laboratory studies suggest that digoxin (a medication used to treat heart conditions) may reduce the ability of heart cells to absorb and use vitamin B1; this may be particularly true when digoxin is combined with furosemide (a loop diuretic).

Diuretics
Diuretics (particularly furosemide, which belongs to a class called loop diuretics) may reduce the levels of vitamin B1 in the body. In addition, similar to digoxin, furosemide may diminish the heart's ability to absorb and utilize vitamin B1, especially when these two medications are combined.

Scopolamine
Vitamin B1 may help reduce some of the side effects associated with scopolamine, a medication commonly used to treat motion sickness.


Possible Interactions with: Vitamin B2

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use vitamin B2 supplements without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Antibiotics, Tetracycline
Riboflavin should not be taken at the same time as the antibiotic tetracycline because it interferes with the absorption and effectiveness of this medication. Riboflavin either alone or in combination with other B vitamins should be taken at different times from tetracycline. (All vitamin B complex supplements act in this way and should therefore be taken at different times from tetracycline.)

In addition, long-term use of antibiotics can deplete vitamin B levels in the body, particularly B2, B9, B12, and vitamin H (biotin), which is considered part of the B complex.

Antidepressant Medications
Tricyclic antidepressants (such as imipramine, desimpramine, amitriptyline, and nortriptyline) also reduce levels of riboflavin in the body. Taking riboflavin may improve levels of the vitamin and improve the effectiveness of these antidepressants, especially in elderly patients.

Anti-malarial Medications
Riboflavin may reduce the effectiveness of anti-malarial medications such as chloroquine and mefloquine.

Antipsychotic Medications
Antipsychotic medications called phenothiazines (such as chlorpromazine) may lower riboflavin levels.

Birth Control Medications
Poor dietary habits in combination with birth control medications can interfere with the body's ability to use riboflavin.

Doxorubicin
In the presence of daylight, riboflavin may deactivate doxorubicin, a medication used for the treatment of certain cancers. In addition, doxorubicin may deplete levels of riboflavin and, therefore, increased amounts of this nutrient may be recommended during chemotherapy using this drug. Your doctor will guide you on whether this is necessary or not.

Methotrexate
Methotrexate, a medication used to treat cancer, can prevent the body from making riboflavin (as well as other essential vitamins).

Phenytoin
Phenytoin, a medication used to control epileptic seizures, may affect riboflavin levels in children.

Probenecid
This medication used for gout may decrease the absorption of riboflavin from the digestive tract and increase the excretion in the urine.

Selegiline
Similar to its effects on doxorubicin, riboflavin may deactivate selegiline, a medication used to treat Parkinson's disease, in the presence of daylight.

Sulfa-containing Medications
Riboflavin may reduce the effectiveness of sulfa-containing medications, such as certain antibiotics (for example, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole) used to treat bacterial infections.

In addition, as stated earlier, long-term use of antibiotics can deplete vitamin B levels in the body, particularly B2, B9, B12, and vitamin H (biotin), which is considered part of the B complex. 

Thiazide Diuretics
Diuretics that belong to a class known as thiazides, such as hydrochlorothiazide, may increase the loss of riboflavin in the urine.


Possible Interactions with: Vitamin B3

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use niacin without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Antibiotics, Tetracycline
Niacin should not be taken at the same time as the antibiotic tetracycline because it interferes with the absorption and effectiveness of this medication. Niacin either alone or in combination with other B vitamins should be taken at different times from tetracycline. (All vitamin B complex supplements act in this way and should therefore be taken at different times from tetracycline.)

Aspirin
Taking aspirin before taking niacin may reduce flushing associated with this vitamin. This should only be done under the advice of a healthcare practitioner.

Blood Pressure Medications, Alpha-blockers
When niacin is taken with certain blood pressure medications known as alpha-blockers (such as prazosin, doxazosin, and guanabenz), the likelihood of side effects from these medications is increased.

Cholesterol-lowering Medications
Niacin binds bile-acid sequestrants (cholesterol-lowering medications such as colestipol, colesevelam, and cholestyramine) and may decrease their effectiveness. For this reason, niacin and these medications should be taken at different times of the day.

As described earlier, recent scientific evidence suggests that taking niacin with simvastatin (a drug that belongs to a class of cholesterol-lowering medications known as HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors or statins including atorvastatin and lovastatin as well), appears to slow down the progression of heart disease. However, the combination may also increases the likelihood for serious side effects, such as muscle inflammation or liver damage.

Diabetes Medications
People taking insulin, metformin, glyburide, glipizide, or other medications used to treat high blood sugar levels should monitor their blood sugar levels closely when taking niacin supplements.

Isoniazid (INH)
INH, a medication used to treat tuberculosis, may deplete levels of niacin and cause a deficiency.

Nicotine Patches
The use of nicotine patches with niacin may worsen or increase the risk of flushing reactions associated with this vitamin when used medicinally.


Possible Interactions with: Vitamin B6

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use vitamin B6 supplements without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Antibiotics, Tetracycline
Vitamin B6 should not be taken at the same time as the antibiotic tetracycline because it interferes with the absorption and effectiveness of this medication. Vitamin B6 either alone or in combination with other B vitamins should be taken at different times from tetracycline. (All vitamin B complex supplements act in this way and should therefore be taken at different times from tetracycline.)

Antidepressant Medications, Tricyclic
Taking vitamin B6 supplements may improve the effectiveness of certain tricyclic antidepressants such as nortriptyline, especially in elderly individuals. Other tricyclic antidepressants include desipramine and imipramine.

On the other hand, another class of antidepressants called monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) may reduce blood levels of vitamin B6. Examples of MAOIs include phenelzine and tranylcypromine.

Antipsychotic Medications
Preliminary evidence suggest that pyridoxine may prove useful in treating tardive dyskinesia, a common but frustrating side effect from medications used to treat schizophrenia. Tardive dyskinesia is marked by involuntary movements of the mouth and tongue. More research is needed to know if vitamin B6 can help prevent or treat this side effect.

Tuberculosis Medications
Anti-tuberculosis medications such as isoniazid (INH) and cycloserine (used for resistant forms of tuberculosis) reduce the levels of vitamin B6 in the blood.

Birth control medications
Birth control medications may reduce blood levels of vitamin B6.

Chemotherapy
Vitamin B6 may reduce certain side effects of 5-fluorouracil and doxorubicin, two agents used to treat cancer without reducing the effectiveness of the chemotherapy.

Erythropoietin
Erythropoietin therapy used for severe anemia may decrease vitamin B6 levels in red blood cells. Therefore, vitamin B6 supplementation may be necessary during erythropoietin therapy.

Hydralazine
Vitamin B6 decreases the effectiveness of hydralazine, a medication used to treat high blood pressure.

Levodopa
Vitamin B6 reduces the effectiveness of levodopa, a medication used to treat Parkinson's disease.

Methotrexate
People with rheumatoid arthritis taking this medication often have low levels of vitamin B6.

Penicillamine
Penicillamine, a medication used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and Wilson's disease (excessive amounts of copper in the body that can lead to liver damage) may decrease levels of vitamin B6 in the body.

Phenytoin
Vitamin B6 reduces the effectiveness of phenytoin, a medication used to treat seizures.

Theophylline
Long-term treatment with theophylline for asthma may reduce blood levels of vitamin B6.


Possible Interactions with: Vitamin B9 (folic acid)

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use folic acid supplements without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Antibiotics, Tetracycline
Folic acid should not be taken at the same time as the antibiotic tetracycline because it interferes with the absorption and effectiveness of this medication. Folic acid either alone or in combination with other B vitamins should be taken at different times from tetracycline. (All vitamin B complex supplements act in this way and should therefore be taken at different times from tetracycline.)

In addition, long-term use of antibiotics can deplete vitamin B levels in the body, particularly B2, B9, B12, and vitamin H (biotin), which is considered part of the B complex.

Aspirin, Ibuprofen, and Acetaminophen
When taken for long periods of time, these medications, as well as other anti-inflammatories can increase the body's need for folic acid.

Birth Control Medications, Anticonvulsants, and Cholesterol-lowering Medications
Birth control medications, anticonvulsants for seizures (namely, phenytoin and carbamazapine), and cholesterol-lowering medications (namely, bile acid sequestrants including cholestyramine, colestipol, and colesevelam) may reduce the levels of folic acid in the blood as well as the body's ability to use this vitamin. Extra folate when taking any of these medications may be recommended by your healthcare provider. When taking bile acid sequestrants for cholesterol, folate should be taken at a different time of day.

Sulfasalazine
Sulfasalazine, a medication used for ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, may reduce the absorption of folic acid, leading to lower levels of folic acid in the blood.

Methotrexate
Methotrexate, a medication used to treat cancer and rheumatoid arthritis, increases the body's need for folic acid. Folic acid reduces the side effects of methotrexate without decreasing its effectiveness.

Other
Antacids, cimetidine, and ranitidine (used for ulcers, heartburn, and related symptoms) as well as metformin (used for diabetes) may inhibit the absorption of folic acid. It is best, therefore, to take folic acid at a different time from any of these medications.

Barbiturates, such as pentobarbital and phenobarbital, used for seizures, may impair folic acid metabolism.


Possible Interactions with: Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin)

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use vitamin B12 supplements without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Antibiotics, Tetracycline
Vitamin B12 should not be taken at the same time as the antibiotic tetracycline because it interferes with the absorption and effectiveness of this medication. Vitamin B12 either alone or in combination with other B vitamins should be taken at different times of the day from tetracycline. (All vitamin B complex supplements act in this way and should therefore be taken at different times from tetracycline.)

In addition, long-term use of antibiotics can deplete vitamin B levels in the body, particularly B2, B9, B12, and vitamin H (biotin), which is considered part of the B complex.

Anti-ulcer Medications
The body's ability to absorb vitamin B12 is decreased when taking stomach acid-reducing medications such as omeprazole, lansoprazole, ranitidine, cimetidine, or antacids that are often used to treat gastroesophageal reflux, ulcers or related symptoms. This interference is most likely to occur as a result of prolonged use (more than one year) of these medications.

Chemotherapy Medications
Blood levels of vitamin B12 may be reduced when taking chemotherapy medications (particularly methotrexate) for cancer.

Metformin for diabetes
Blood levels of vitamin B12 may also be reduced when taking metformin for diabetes.

Phenobarbital and Phenytoin
Long-term treatment with either phenobarbital and phenytoin for seizure disorders may interfere with the body's ability to use vitamin B12.


Possible Interactions with: Vitamin H (Biotin)

Although there are no reports in the medical literature of interactions between biotin and conventional medications, there are some medications that may deplete biotin levels. If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use vitamin A without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Antibiotics
Long- term antibiotic use may decrease biotin levels by destroying the bacteria in the gut that produces biotin.

Anticonvulsant Medications
Long-term use of anticonvulsant medications such as phenytoin, primidone, carbamezepine, and phenobarbital can deplete the body's stores of biotin, possibly by interfering with absorption and increasing urinary excretion. Similarly, valproic acid can cause biotinidase deficiency which may be helped by biotin supplements.


Possible Interactions with: Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid)

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use vitamin B5 supplements without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Antibiotics, Tetracycline
Vitamin B5 should not be taken at the same time as the antibiotic tetracycline because it interferes with the absorption and effectiveness of this medication. B vitamins should be taken at different times from tetracycline. (All vitamin B complex supplements act in this way and should therefore be taken at different times from tetracycline.)


Possible Interactions with: Iron

If you are currently being treated with any of the medications discussed below, you should not use iron without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Iron may interfere with the absorption of many different medications. For this reason, it is best to take iron supplements at least two hours before or two hours after taking medications. This is particularly true for the medications listed below.

The following medications may reduce the absorption of iron:

  • Cholestyramine and Colestipol: These are two cholesterol-lowering medications known as bile acid sequestrants.
  • Medications used to treat ulcers or other stomach problems: Examples of anti-ulcer medications include cimetidine, ranitidine, famotidine, and nizatidine. These medications belong to a class of drugs known as H2 receptor blockers. They change the pH in the stomach and subsequently alter the absorption of iron. It is possible that this effect could occur with other antiulcer medications including antacids and proton pump inhibitors (such as omeprazole and lansoprazole).

Iron decreases the absorption of the following medications:

  • Tetracyclines: These are a class of antibiotics that include doxycycline, minocycline, and tetracycline.
  • Quinolones: These are a class of antibiotics that include ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, and levofloxacin.
  • ACE inhibitors: These are a class of medications used to treat high blood pressure. Examples include captopril, enalapril, and lisinopril.

Iron may reduce the effectiveness or blood levels of the following medications:

  • Carbidopa and Levodopa: Iron lowers blood levels of these medications but it is unclear whether these changes lower the effectiveness of the drugs.
  • Levothyroxine: Iron may decrease the effectiveness of this thyroid replacement hormone. A healthcare practitioner should monitor thyroid function closely in those taking iron supplements with thyroid medications.

Iron levels may be increased by:

  • Birth control medications 

Possible Interactions with: Iodine

There are no reports in the scientific literature to suggest that iodine interacts with any conventional medications. However, iodine should be used with caution by people taking thyroid medications.


Possible Interactions with: Magnesium

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use magnesium without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Antibiotics
The absorption of quinolone antibiotics (such as ciprofloxacin and moxofloxacin), tetracycline antibiotics (including tetracycline, doxycycline, and minocycline), and nitrofurantoin is diminished when taken with magnesium supplements. Therefore, magnesium should be taken two to four hours before or after taking these medications to avoid interference with absorption.

Blood Pressure Medications, Calcium Channel Blockers
Magnesium may increase the likelihood of negative side effects (such as dizziness, nausea, and fluid retention) from calcium channel blockers (particularly nifedipine) in pregnant women. Other calcium channel blockers include amlodipine, diltiazem, felodipine, and verapamil.

Diabetic Medications
Magnesium hydroxide, commonly found in antacids, may increase the absorption of glipizide and glyburide, medications used to control blood sugar levels. Ultimately, this may prove to allow for reduction in the dosage of those medications.

Digoxin
It is important that normal levels of magnesium be maintained while taking digoxin because low blood levels of magnesium can increase adverse effects from this drug. In addition, digoxin can lead to increased loss of magnesium in the urine. A healthcare provider will follow magnesium levels closely to determine whether magnesium supplementation is necessary.

Diuretics
Two types of diuretics known as loop (such as furosemide) and thiazide (including hydrochlorothiazide) can deplete magnesium levels. For this reason, physicians who prescribe diuretics may consider recommending magnesium supplements as well.

Hormone Replacement Therapy for menopause
Magnesium levels tend to decrease during menopause. Studies suggest, however, that hormone replacement therapy may help prevent the loss of this mineral. Postmenopausal women or those taking hormone replacement therapy should talk with a healthcare provider about the risks and benefits of magnesium supplementation.

Levothyroxine
There have been case reports of magnesium containing antacids reducing the effectiveness of levothyroxine, which is taken for an under active thyroid. This is important because many people take laxatives containing magnesium without letting their doctor know.

Penicillamine
Penicillamine, a medication used for the treatment of Wilson's disease (a condition characterized by high levels of copper in the body) and rheumatoid arthritis, can inactivate magnesium, particularly when high doses of the drug are used over a long period of time. Even with this relative inactivation, however, supplementation with magnesium and other nutrients by those taking penicillamine may reduce side effects associated with this medication. A healthcare practitioner can determine whether magnesium supplements are safe and appropriate if you are taking penicillamine.

Tiludronate and Alendronate
Magnesium may interfere with absorption of tiludronate, a medication similar to alendronate that is used for the treatment of osteoporosis. This interaction has not been reported with alendronate specifically. Magnesium supplements or magnesium-containing antacids should be taken at least two hours before or two hours after taking these medications to minimize potential interference with absorption.

Others
Aminoglycoside antibiotics (such as gentamicin and tobramycin), thiazide diuretics (such as hydrochlorothiazide), loop diuretics (such as furosemide and bumetanide), amphotericin B, corticosteroids, antacids, and insulin may lower magnesium levels. Please refer to the depletions monographs on some of these medications for more information.


Possible Interactions with: Zinc

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use zinc without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Blood Pressure Medications, ACE Inhibitors
A class of medications called ACE Inhibitors, such as captopril and enalpril, used for high blood pressure may deplete zinc stores.

Antibiotics
Zinc may decrease the absorption of oral quinolones, a class of antibiotics that includes ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, and levofloxacin, as well as tetracycline antibiotics (including tetracycline, doxycycline, and minocycline).

Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT)
HRT, consisting of estrogen and progesterone derivatives may reduce loss of zinc in the urine, particularly in women with osteoporosis.

Hydralazine
There has been at least one report of an interaction between zinc and hydralazine, a medication used to treat high blood pressure, which resulted in a lupus-erythematosus-like syndrome (characterized by a facial butterfly rash, fever, leg and mouth ulcers, and abdominal distress).

Immunosuppressant Medications
Since zinc supports immune function, it should not be taken with corticosteroids, cyclosporine, or other medications intended to suppress the immune system.

Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)
Zinc interacts with NSAIDs and could reduce the absorption and effectiveness of these medications. Examples of NSAIDs, which help to reduce pain and inflammation, include ibuprofen, naprosyn, piroxicam, and indomethacin.

Penicillamine
This medication, used to treat Wilson's disease (excessive amounts of copper that accumulate in the brain, liver, kidney, and eyes) and rheumatoid arthritis, decreases zinc levels.


Possible Interactions with: Copper

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use copper supplements without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Birth Control Medications and Estrogen following menopause
Birth control medications and estrogen replacement for post-menopausal women can increase blood levels of copper. Therefore, copper supplements are not appropriate and may be cause for concern in individuals taking either of these medications.

Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)
Copper binds to NSAIDs (such as ibuprofen and naproxen) and appears to enhance their anti-inflammatory activity.

Penicillamine
Penicillamine (a medication used to treat Wilson's disease and rheumatoid arthritis) reduces copper levels that may be the intended use, as in the case of Wilson's disease.

Allopurinol
Test tube studies suggest that allopurinol, a medication used to treat gout, may reduce copper levels.

Cimetidine
Animal studies show that cimetidine, a medication used to treat ulcers and gastric esophageal reflux disease (when acid from the stomach enters the esophagus and causes heartburn and indigestion), may elevate copper levels in the body leading to damage of the liver and other organs.


Possible Interactions with: Manganese

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use manganese supplements without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Haloperidol and other Antipsychotics
There has been at least one report of an interaction between haloperidol and manganese that resulted in hallucinations and behavioral changes in a person with liver disease. In addition, some experts believe that medications for schizophrenia and other forms of psychosis may worsen side effects from manganese supplements. Therefore, individuals taking haloperidol or other antipsychotic medications (particularly a class called phenothiazines which includes chlorpromazine, mesoridazine, perphenazine, prochlorperazine, thioridazine, and trifluoperazine) should use manganese only under the careful supervision of a qualified health professional.

Reserpine
Reserpine, a medication used to treat high blood pressure, may decrease manganese levels in the body.


Possible Interactions with: Para-Aminobenzoic Acid

We are unaware of any interactions with this supplement.


Possible Interactions with: Citrus Bioflavanoids

We are unaware of any interactions with this supplement.


Possible Interactions with: Rutin

We are unaware of any interactions with this supplement.


Possible Interactions with: Betain HCI

We are unaware of any interactions with this supplement.


Possible Interactions with: Hesperidin

We are unaware of any interactions with this supplement.


Possible Interactions with: Huperzine A Extract

We are unaware of any interactions with this supplement.


Possible Interactions with: Choline

We are unaware of any interactions with this supplement.


Possible Interactions with: Inositol

We are unaware of any interactions with this supplement.


Possible Interactions with: L-Glutamine

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use glutamine supplements without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Cancer Therapy
Glutamine may increase the effectiveness and reduce the side effects of chemotherapy treatments with doxorubicin, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil in people with colon cancer. Similarly, preliminary studies suggest that glutamine supplements may prevent nerve damage associated with a medication called paclitaxel, used for breast and other types of cancers.

However, test tube studies suggest that glutamine may actually stimulate growth of tumors. Much more research is needed before it is known whether it is safe to use glutamine if you have cancer.


Possible Interactions with: Cat's Claw

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use cat's claw without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Immunosuppressive Medications
In theory, because cat's claw may stimulate the immune system, this herb should not be used with medications intended to suppress the immune system, such as cyclosporin or other medications prescribed following an organ transplant. This theory has not been tested scientifically.

NSAIDs
Cat's claw may protect against gastrointestinal damage associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen.


Possible Interactions with: Licorice

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use licorice without first talking to your healthcare provider:

Ace-inhibitors and diuretics
If you are taking angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or diuretics (except potassium-sparing diuretics) to regulate blood pressure, do not use licorice products. Licorice could interfere with the effectiveness of these medications or could worsen possible side effects.

Aspirin
Animal studies suggest that licorice may reduce stomach irritation as well as the risk of stomach ulcers associated with aspirin.

Digoxin
Because licorice may dangerously increase the risk of toxic effects from digoxin, this herb should not be taken with this medication.

Corticosteroids
Licorice may increase the effects of corticosteroid medications. You should consult with your doctor before using licorice with any corticosteroids.

Insulin
Licorice may enhance some of the adverse effects of insulin.

Laxatives
Licorice may cause substantial potassium loss in people taking stimulant laxatives.

Oral contraceptives
There have been reports of women developing high blood pressure and low potassium levels when they took licorice while on oral contraceptives. Therefore, you should avoid licorice if you are taking birth control medications.


Possible Interactions with: Olive Extract

We are unaware of any interactions with this supplement.


 

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