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Possible Interactions with Capisette

Medications that may interact with Capisette.
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Possible Interactions with: Magnesium (Oxide)

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use magnesium supplements without first talking to your healthcare provider. 

Antibiotics (Aminoglycoside antibiotics)

Some antibiotics are known to affect the muscles, and magnesium also affects the muscles. Therefore, taking aminoglycoside antibiotics might cause muscle problems. Some aminoglycoside antibiotics include amikacin, gentamicin, kanamycin, streptomycin, tobramycin, and others. 

Antibiotics (Quinolone antibiotics)

Taking magnesium along with these antibiotics might decrease the effectiveness of the medications. Some of these antibiotics that might interact with magnesium include ciprofloxacin, enoxacin, norfloxacin, sparfloxacin, trovafloxacin, and grepafloxacin. 

Bisphosphonates

Magnesium might decrease the amount of bisphosphate absorbed by the body. Taking magnesium along with bisphosphates might reduce the effectiveness of bisphosphate. To avoid this, take bisphosphonate at least 2 hours before magnesium supplements or later in the day. 

Blood Pressure Medications (Calcium channel blockers)

Magnesium supplements might lower your blood pressure levels. Taking magnesium with high blood pressure medications might cause your blood pressure to go too low. Some medications to avoid are verapamil (Calan, Isoptin, Verelan), nifedipine (Adalat, Procardia), isradipine (DynaCirc), diltiazem (Cardizem), felodipine (Plendil), amlodipine (Norvasc), and others. 

Muscle Relaxants

Magnesium supplements help to relax muscles. Taking magnesium along with muscle relaxants might increase the risk of side effects. You should avoid some muscle relaxants such as gallamine (Flaxedil), carisoprodol (Soma), orphenadrine (Banflex, Disipal), pipecuronium (Arduan), cyclobenzaprine, pancuronium (Pavulon), succinylcholine (Anectine), atracurium (Tracrium), and others. 

Water pills (Potassium-sparing diuretics)

Some diuretics might increase magnesium levels in the body. You must avoid taking these water pills with magnesium: amiloride, spironolactone, and triamterene.


Possible Interactions with: Potassium (Chloride)

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use potassium supplements without first talking to your healthcare provider. 

ACE inhibitors:

If you are taking potassium supplements, you should avoid ACE inhibitors such as benazepril, captopril, fosinopril, enalapril, lisinopril, moexipril, perindopril, quinapril, ramipril, or trandolapril. 

Water Pills:

Potassium supplements might interact with these diuretics or water pills: bumetanide, chlorothiazide, chlorthalidone, ethacrynic acid, furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide, indapamide, metolazone, or torsemide.


Possible Interactions with: Uva Ursi

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use uva ursi without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Drugs and supplements that make urine more acidic:

These include cranberry juice, orange juice, vitamin C, and other citrus fruits and juices.

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and corticosteroids:

Animal studies carried out in Japan suggest uva ursi might increase the anti-inflammatory effects of these drugs; although it isn't known whether the herb would have that effect in humans.


Possible Interactions with: Dandelion Extracts

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use dandelion extracts without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Lithium:

Dandelion might worsen the side effects associated with lithium, a medication used to treat bipolar disorder.


Possible Interactions with: Ginkgo Biloba

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use ginkgo biloba for edema without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Anticonvulsant medications:

Taking high doses of ginkgo might decrease the effectiveness of anticonvulsant therapy, such as carbamazepine or valproic acid, in controlling seizures.

Antidepressant medications:

Taking ginkgo along with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRIs) antidepressants (fluoxetin, sertraline, paroxetine, and escitalopram) might cause serotonin syndrome. It might also enhance the effects of antidepressant medications known as MAOIs.

Antihypertensive medications:

Ginkgo might lower the blood pressure, so use of the herb along with prescription antihypertensive medications should be monitored by a doctor. There have been reports of interactions between ginkgo and nifedipine, a calcium channel blocking drug used for blood pressure.

Blood-thinning medications:

Ginkgo is known to have blood-thinning properties and therefore it should not be taken if you are using anticoagulants, such as aspirin, clopidogrel, dipyridamole, heparin, ticlopidine, or warfarin.

Blood sugar lowering medications:

Ginkgo might increase insulin levels in healthy subjects and decrease insulin levels in diabetic patients. You should take ginkgo supplements under the supervision of a health care provider if you are taking insulin or oral blood sugar lowering drugs.

Trazodone:

There has been a report of an interaction between ginkgo supplements and trazodone (Desyrel), an antidepressant that resulted in an elderly patient going into a coma.


Possible Interactions with: Horse Chestnut (Aesculus Hippocastanum)

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use horse chestnut without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Lithium:

Taking horse chestnut might decrease how well the body gets rid of lithium. Talk with your healthcare provider before using this herb if you are taking lithium. Your lithium dose might need to be altered.

Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs):

Taking horse chestnut along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low. Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), glyburide (Glynase PresTab, DiaBeta, Micronase), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), rosiglitazone (Avandia), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.

Medications That Slow Blood Clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs):

Taking horse chestnut seed along with anticoagulants / antiplatelets might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding. Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin),diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam), clopidogrel (Plavix), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn), enoxaparin (Lovenox), dalteparin (Fragmin), heparin, warfarin (Coumadin), and others.


Possible Interactions with: Bucha Extracts (Barosma Crenulata)

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use bucha without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Lithium:

Taking bucha might decrease how well the body gets rid of lithium. Talk with your healthcare provider before using bucha if you are taking lithium. Your lithium dose might need to be altered.

Medications That Slow Blood Clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs):

Taking buchu along with anticoagulant / antiplatelet medications might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding. Buchu might interact with aspirin, diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), clopidogrel (Plavix), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn), enoxaparin (Lovenox), dalteparin (Fragmin), heparin, warfarin (Coumadin), and others. 

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CAPISETTE - REDUCE FLUID RETENTION

CAPISETTE - REDUCE FLUID RETENTION

Capisette helps with reducing swelling and reducing edema by providing your body with the electrolytes needed to restore proper fluid tranfer in your cells. It then gets rid of excess fluid with natural diuretics.