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Actimine Interactions

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Medications That May Interact with Actimine.

 Actimine Supplement Facts

 Serving Size:  3 Capsules
 Servings Per Container:  30



  Amount
Per Serving
Daily Value


  Vitamin A 5000 IU 100%

  Selenium 50 mcg 70%

  Vitamin E 200 IU 667%

  Zinc 10 mg 66%



   Methylsulfonyl Methane 1500 mg *

   Gum Guggul Ext. 50 mg *


  Other Ingredients:  Gelatin, Rice Powder, Magnesium Stearate. 
  *Daily Value Not Established



 

Daily Dosage: As a dietary supplement, take two capsules in the morning and one capsule in the evening with 8 ounces of water. 45-60 days of continuous use is necessary for optimum results.

 

 

Actimine Research:

Possible Interactions with: Vitamin A

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use vitamin A without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Antacids - One study suggests that the combination of vitamin A and antacids may be more effective than antacids alone in healing ulcers.

Birth Control Medications - Birth control medications increase the levels of vitamin A in women. Therefore, it may not be appropriate for women taking birth control medications to take vitamin A supplements. Again, this is something that should be discussed with a knowledgeable healthcare provider.

Blood thinning Medications, Anticoagulants - Long-term use of vitamin A or use of high doses may lead to an increased risk of bleeding for those taking blood-thinning medications, particularly warfarin. People taking this medication should notify a doctor before taking vitamin A supplements.

Cholesterol-lowering Medications - The cholesterol-lowering medications cholestyramine and colestipol (both known as bile acid sequestrants), may reduce the body's ability to absorb vitamin A.

Another class of cholesterol-lowering medications called HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors or statins (including atorvastatin, fluvastatin, and lovastatin, among others) may actually increase vitamin A levels in the blood.

Doxorubicin - Test tube studies suggest that vitamin A may enhance the action of doxorubicin, a medication used for cancer. Much more research is needed, however, to know whether this has any practical application for people.

Neomycin - This antibiotic may reduce vitamin A absorption, especially when delivered in large doses.

Omeprazole - Omeprazole (used for gastroesophageal reflux disease or "heart burn") may influence the absorption and effectiveness of beta-carotene supplements. It is not known whether this medication affects the absorption of beta-carotene from foods.

Weight Loss Products - Orlistat, a medication used for weight loss and olestra, a substance added to certain food products, are both intended to bind to fat and prevent the absorption of fat and the associated calories. Because of their effects on fat, orlistat and olestra may also prevent the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins such as vitamin A. Given this concern and possibility, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) now requires that vitamin A and other fat soluble vitamins (namely, D, E, and K) be added to food products containing olestra. How well vitamin A from such food products is absorbed and used by the body is not clear. In addition, physicians who prescribe orlistat add a multivitamin with fat soluble vitamins to the regimen.

Alcohol - Alcohol can enhance the toxic effects of vitamin A, presumably through its adverse effects on the liver. It is unwise to take vitamin A if you drink regularly.


Possible Interactions with: Selenium

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use selenium supplements without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Cisplatin, Doxorubicin, and Bleomycin - Selenium may reduce toxic side effects associated with cisplatin and doxorubicin, two forms of chemotherapy used to treat cancer. On the other hand, a test tube study suggested that selenium may inhibit the anti-cancer effects of bleomycin.

Cholesterol-lowering Medications  Researchers recently discovered an unexpected adverse interaction between antioxidant supplements and a popular combination of cholesterol-lowering medications known as simvastatin and niacin -- this interaction may have important implications for patients with heart disease. Together, simvastatin and niacin have been shown to lower LDL ("bad") cholesterol and raise HDL ("good") cholesterol in people with heart disease. When taken with antioxidants (including selenium), however, these medications may not be as effective in raising HDL cholesterol.


Possible Interactions with: Vitamin E

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use vitamin E supplements without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Antidepressant Medications, Tricyclic - Vitamin E inhibits the uptake by cells of the antidepressant desimpramine, which belongs to a class of drugs known as tricyclics. Other members of that class include imipramine and nortriptyline.

Antipsychotic Medications - Vitamin E can inhibit the uptake by cells of the antipsychotic medication called chlorpromazine, which belongs to a class of drugs known as phenothiazines.

Aspirin - A study evaluating the effects of vitamin E and aspirin suggests that the combination appears to be safe and may benefit patients at risk for stroke.

AZT - Vitamin E may protect against toxicity and side effects from AZT, a medication used to treat HIV and AIDS.

Beta Blockers for high blood pressure - Vitamin E inhibits the uptake by cells of propranolol, a member of a class of medications called beta blockers used for high blood pressure. Other beta-blockers include atenolol and metoprolol.

Birth Control Medications - Vitamin E may provide antioxidant benefits to women taking birth control medications.

Chloroquine - Vitamin E can inhibit the uptake into cells of chloroquine, a medication used to treat malaria.

Cholesterol-lowering Medications - Cholesterol-lowering medications such as colestipol and cholestyramine, called bile-acid sequestrants, decrease the absorption of vitamin E. Gemfibrozil, a different type of cholesterol-lowering medication called a fibric acid derivative, may also reduce vitamin E levels. A third class of medications used to lower cholesterol levels known as statins (such as atorvastatin, pravastatin, and lovastatin), may reduce the antioxidant activity of vitamin E. On the other hand, the combination of vitamin E supplements with statins may help protect blood vessels from dysfunction.

Cyclosporine - Vitamin E may interact with cyclosporine, a medication used to treat cancer, reducing the effectiveness of both the supplement and the medication. However, there appears to be some controversy regarding the nature of this interaction; another study suggests that the combination of vitamin E and cyclosporine may actually increase the effects of the medication. More research is needed to determine the safety of this combination.

Hormone Replacement Therapy - Vitamin E supplements may benefit women taking hormone replacement therapy by improving lipid profiles.

Mebendazole - Simultaneous supplementation with vitamins A, C, E, and selenium significantly reduced the effectiveness of this vermifuge (treatment to eradicate intestinal worms) in a study.

Tamoxifen - Tamoxifen, a hormonal treatment for breast cancer, increases blood levels of triglycerides, increasing one's chances of developing high cholesterol. In a study of 54 women with breast cancer, vitamins C and E, taken along with the tamoxifen, counteracted this by decreasing low density cholesterol and triglyceride levels while increasing high density cholesterol. The antioxidants also enhanced the anti-cancer action of the tamoxifen.

Warfarin - Taking vitamin E at the same time as warfarin, a blood-thinning medication, increases the risk of abnormal bleeding, especially in vitamin K-deficient individuals.

Weight Loss Products - Orlistat, a medication used for weight loss and olestra, a substance added to certain food products, are both intended to bind to fat and prevent the absorption of fat and the associated calories. Because of their effects on fat, orlistat and olestra may also prevent the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins such as vitamin E. Given this concern and possibility, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) now requires that vitamin E and other fat soluble vitamins (namely, A, D, and K) be added to food products containing olestra. How well vitamin E from such food products is absorbed and used by the body is not clear. In addition, physicians who prescribe orlistat may add a multivitamin with fat soluble vitamins to the regimen.


Possible Interactions with: Zinc

Blood Pressure Medications, ACE Inhibitors - A class of medications called ACE Inhibitors, such as captopril and enalpril, used for high blood pressure may deplete zinc stores.

Antibiotics - Zinc may decrease the absorption of oral quinolones, a class of antibiotics that includes ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, and levofloxacin, as well as tetracycline antibiotics (including tetracycline, doxycycline, and minocycline).

Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) - HRT, consisting of estrogen and progesterone derivatives may reduce loss of zinc in the urine, particularly in women with osteoporosis.

Hydralazine - There has been at least one report of an interaction between zinc and hydralazine, a medication used to treat high blood pressure, which resulted in a lupus-erythematosus-like syndrome (characterized by a facial butterfly rash, fever, leg and mouth ulcers, and abdominal distress).

Immunosuppressant Medications - Since zinc supports immune function, it should not be taken with corticosteroids, cyclosporine, or other medications intended to suppress the immune system.

Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) - Zinc interacts with NSAIDs and could reduce the absorption and effectiveness of these medications. Examples of NSAIDs, which help to reduce pain and inflammation, include ibuprofen, naprosyn, piroxicam, and indomethacin.

Penicillamine - This medication, used to treat Wilson's disease (excessive amounts of copper that accumulate in the brain, liver, kidney, and eyes) and rheumatoid arthritis, decreases zinc levels.


Possible Interactions with: Methylsulfonyl Methane

We are unaware of any interactions with this supplement.


Possible Interactions with: Gum Guggul Ext.

We are unaware of any interactions with this supplement.