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Alorex Interactions

Medications That May Interact with Alorex.
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Alorex Supplement Facts

 Serving Size:  3 Capsules
 Servings Per Container:  30



  Amount
Per Serving
Daily Value


   Vitamin B-1 (as Thiamin HCL) 5 mg 333%

   Vitamin B-2 (as Riboflavin) 5 mg 294%

   Vitamin B-3 (as Niacinamide) 5 mg 25%

   Vitamin B-6 (as Pyridoxine HCL) 25 mg 1250%

   Vitamin B-12 (as Cyanocobalamin) 20 mcg 333%

   D-Calcium Pantothenate 5 mg 50%

   Zinc (as Zinc Oxide) 10 mg 66%



   L-Glutamine 1000 mg *

   Deglycyrrhizinated Licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) (root) 350 mg *

   Artichoke (Cynara scolymus) (leaf) 350 mg *


   Other Ingredients:  Gelatin, Rice Powder, Magnesium Stearate.
   *Daily Value Not Established



Daily Dosage: As a dietary supplement, take two capsules in the morning and one capsule in the evening with 8 ounces of water. 45-60 days of continuous use is necessary for optimum results.  

Alorex Research:

Possible Interactions with: Vitam B-1in (as Thiamin HCL)
Also listed as: Thiamine; Vitamin B1 (Thiamine)

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use vitamin B1 without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Antibiotics, Tetracycline - Vitamin B1 should not be taken at the same time as the antibiotic tetracycline because it interferes with the absorption and effectiveness of this medication. Vitamin B1 either alone or in combination with other B vitamins should be taken at different times from tetracycline. (All vitamin B complex supplements act in this way and should therefore be taken at different times from tetracycline.)

Antidepressant Medications, Tricylic - Taking vitamin B1 supplements may improve treatment with antidepressants such as nortriptyline, especially in elderly patients. Other medications in this class of antidepressants include desimpramine and imipramine.

Chemotherapy - Although the significance is not entirely clear, laboratory studies suggest that thiamine may inhibit the anti-cancer activity of chemotherapy agents. How this will ultimately prove relevant to people is not known. However, it may be wise for people undergoing chemotherapy for cancer to not take large doses of vitamin B1 supplements.

Digoxin - Laboratory studies suggest that digoxin (a medication used to treat heart conditions) may reduce the ability of heart cells to absorb and use vitamin B1; this may be particularly true when digoxin is combined with furosemide (a loop diuretic).

Diuretics - Diuretics (particularly furosemide, which belongs to a class called loop diuretics) may reduce the levels of vitamin B1 in the body. In addition, similar to digoxin, furosemide may diminish the heart's ability to absorb and utilize vitamin B1, especially when these two medications are combined.

Scopolamine - Vitamin B1 may help reduce some of the side effects associated with scopolamine, a medication commonly used to treat motion sickness.


Possible Interactions with: Vitamin B-2 (as Riboflavin)
Also listed as: Riboflavin; Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin)

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use vitamin B2 supplements without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Antibiotics, Tetracycline - Riboflavin should not be taken at the same time as the antibiotic tetracycline because it interferes with the absorption and effectiveness of this medication. Riboflavin either alone or in combination with other B vitamins should be taken at different times from tetracycline. (All vitamin B complex supplements act in this way and should therefore be taken at different times from tetracycline.)

In addition, long-term use of antibiotics can deplete vitamin B levels in the body, particularly B2, B9, B12, and vitamin H (biotin), which is considered part of the B complex.

Antidepressant Medications - Tricyclic antidepressants (such as imipramine, desimpramine, amitriptyline, and nortriptyline) also reduce levels of riboflavin in the body. Taking riboflavin may improve levels of the vitamin and improve the effectiveness of these antidepressants, especially in elderly patients.

Anti-malarial Medications - Riboflavin may reduce the effectiveness of anti-malarial medications such as chloroquine and mefloquine.

Antipsychotic Medications - Antipsychotic medications called phenothiazines (such as chlorpromazine) may lower riboflavin levels.

Birth Control Medications - Poor dietary habits in combination with birth control medications can interfere with the body's ability to use riboflavin.

Doxorubicin - In the presence of daylight, riboflavin may deactivate doxorubicin, a medication used for the treatment of certain cancers. In addition, doxorubicin may deplete levels of riboflavin and, therefore, increased amounts of this nutrient may be recommended during chemotherapy using this drug. Your doctor will guide you on whether this is necessary or not.

Methotrexate - Methotrexate, a medication used to treat cancer, can prevent the body from making riboflavin (as well as other essential vitamins).

Phenytoin - Phenytoin, a medication used to control epileptic seizures, may affect riboflavin levels in children.

Probenecid - This medication used for gout may decrease the absorption of riboflavin from the digestive tract and increase the excretion in the urine.

Selegiline - Similar to its effects on doxorubicin, riboflavin may deactivate selegiline, a medication used to treat Parkinson's disease, in the presence of daylight.

Sulfa-containing Medications - Riboflavin may reduce the effectiveness of sulfa-containing medications, such as certain antibiotics (for example, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole) used to treat bacterial infections.

In addition, as stated earlier, long-term use of antibiotics can deplete vitamin B levels in the body, particularly B2, B9, B12, and vitamin H (biotin), which is considered part of the B complex.  

Thiazide Diuretics - Diuretics that belong to a class known as thiazides, such as hydrochlorothiazide, may increase the loss of riboflavin in the urine.
 


Possible Interactions with: Vitamin B-3 (as Niacinamide)
Also listed as: Inositol Hexaniacinate; Niacin; Niacinamide; Nicotinamide; Nicotinic Acid; Vitamin B3 (Niacin)

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use niacin without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Antibiotics, Tetracycline - Niacin should not be taken at the same time as the antibiotic tetracycline because it interferes with the absorption and effectiveness of this medication. Niacin either alone or in combination with other B vitamins should be taken at different times from tetracycline. (All vitamin B complex supplements act in this way and should therefore be taken at different times from tetracycline.)

Aspirin - Taking aspirin before taking niacin may reduce flushing associated with this vitamin. This should only be done under the advice of a healthcare practitioner.

Blood Pressure Medications, Alpha-blockers - When niacin is taken with certain blood pressure medications known as alpha-blockers (such as prazosin, doxazosin, and guanabenz), the likelihood of side effects from these medications is increased.

Cholesterol-lowering Medications - Niacin binds bile-acid sequestrants (cholesterol-lowering medications such as colestipol, colesevelam, and cholestyramine) and may decrease their effectiveness. For this reason, niacin and these medications should be taken at different times of the day.

As described earlier, recent scientific evidence suggests that taking niacin with simvastatin (a drug that belongs to a class of cholesterol-lowering medications known as HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors or statins including atorvastatin and lovastatin as well), appears to slow down the progression of heart disease. However, the combination may also increases the likelihood for serious side effects, such as muscle inflammation or liver damage.

Diabetes Medications - People taking insulin, metformin, glyburide, glipizide, or other medications used to treat high blood sugar levels should monitor their blood sugar levels closely when taking niacin supplements.

Isoniazid (INH) - INH, a medication used to treat tuberculosis, may deplete levels of niacin and cause a deficiency.

Nicotine Patches - The use of nicotine patches with niacin may worsen or increase the risk of flushing reactions associated with this vitamin when used medicinally.
 


Possible Interactions with: Vitamin B-6 (as Pyridoxine HCL)
Also listed as: Pyridoxine; Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine)

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use vitamin B6 supplements without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Antibiotics, Tetracycline - Vitamin B6 should not be taken at the same time as the antibiotic tetracycline because it interferes with the absorption and effectiveness of this medication. Vitamin B6 either alone or in combination with other B vitamins should be taken at different times from tetracycline. (All vitamin B complex supplements act in this way and should therefore be taken at different times from tetracycline.)

Antidepressant Medications, Tricyclic - Taking vitamin B6 supplements may improve the effectiveness of certain tricyclic antidepressants such as nortriptyline, especially in elderly individuals. Other tricyclic antidepressants include desipramine and imipramine.

On the other hand, another class of antidepressants called monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) may reduce blood levels of vitamin B6. Examples of MAOIs include phenelzine and tranylcypromine.

Antipsychotic Medications - Preliminary evidence suggest that pyridoxine may prove useful in treating tardive dyskinesia, a common but frustrating side effect from medications used to treat schizophrenia. Tardive dyskinesia is marked by involuntary movements of the mouth and tongue. More research is needed to know if vitamin B6 can help prevent or treat this side effect.

Tuberculosis Medications - Anti-tuberculosis medications such as isoniazid (INH) and cycloserine (used for resistant forms of tuberculosis) reduce the levels of vitamin B6 in the blood.

Birth control medications Birth control medications may reduce blood levels of vitamin B6.

Chemotherapy - Vitamin B6 may reduce certain side effects of 5-fluorouracil and doxorubicin, two agents used to treat cancer without reducing the effectiveness of the chemotherapy.

Erythropoietin - Erythropoietin therapy used for severe anemia may decrease vitamin B6 levels in red blood cells. Therefore, vitamin B6 supplementation may be necessary during erythropoietin therapy.

Hydralazine - Vitamin B6 decreases the effectiveness of hydralazine, a medication used to treat high blood pressure.

Levodopa - Vitamin B6 reduces the effectiveness of levodopa, a medication used to treat Parkinson's disease.

Methotrexate - People with rheumatoid arthritis taking this medication often have low levels of vitamin B6.

Penicillamine - Penicillamine, a medication used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and Wilson's disease (excessive amounts of copper in the body that can lead to liver damage) may decrease levels of vitamin B6 in the body.

Phenytoin - Vitamin B6 reduces the effectiveness of phenytoin, a medication used to treat seizures.

Theophylline - Long-term treatment with theophylline for asthma may reduce blood levels of vitamin B6.
 


Possible Interactions with: Vitamin B-12 (as Cyanocobalamin)
Also listed as: Cobalamin; Cyanocobalamin; Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin)

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use vitamin B12 supplements without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Antibiotics, Tetracycline - Vitamin B12 should not be taken at the same time as the antibiotic tetracycline because it interferes with the absorption and effectiveness of this medication. Vitamin B12 either alone or in combination with other B vitamins should be taken at different times of the day from tetracycline. (All vitamin B complex supplements act in this way and should therefore be taken at different times from tetracycline.)

In addition, long-term use of antibiotics can deplete vitamin B levels in the body, particularly B2, B9, B12, and vitamin H (biotin), which is considered part of the B complex.

Anti-ulcer Medications - The body's ability to absorb vitamin B12 is decreased when taking stomach acid-reducing medications such as omeprazole, lansoprazole, ranitidine, cimetidine, or antacids that are often used to treat gastroesophageal reflux, ulcers or related symptoms. This interference is most likely to occur as a result of prolonged use (more than one year) of these medications.

Chemotherapy Medications - Blood levels of vitamin B12 may be reduced when taking chemotherapy medications (particularly methotrexate) for cancer.

Metformin for diabetes - Blood levels of vitamin B12 may also be reduced when taking metformin for diabetes.

Phenobarbital and Phenytoin - Long-term treatment with either phenobarbital and phenytoin for seizure disorders may interfere with the body's ability to use vitamin B12.
 


Possible Interactions with: D-Calcium Pantothenate
Also listed as: Pantothenic Acid; Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid)

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use vitamin B5 supplements without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Antibiotics, Tetracycline - Vitamin B5 should not be taken at the same time as the antibiotic tetracycline because it interferes with the absorption and effectiveness of this medication. B vitamins should be taken at different times from tetracycline. (All vitamin B complex supplements act in this way and should therefore be taken at different times from tetracycline.)
 


Possible Interactions with: Zinc (as Zinc Oxide)
Also listed as: Zinc

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use zinc without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Blood Pressure Medications, ACE Inhibitors - A class of medications called ACE Inhibitors, such as captopril and enalpril, used for high blood pressure may deplete zinc stores.

Antibiotics - Zinc may decrease the absorption of oral quinolones, a class of antibiotics that includes ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, and levofloxacin, as well as tetracycline antibiotics (including tetracycline, doxycycline, and minocycline).

Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) - HRT, consisting of estrogen and progesterone derivatives may reduce loss of zinc in the urine, particularly in women with osteoporosis.

Hydralazine - There has been at least one report of an interaction between zinc and hydralazine, a medication used to treat high blood pressure, which resulted in a lupus-erythematosus-like syndrome (characterized by a facial butterfly rash, fever, leg and mouth ulcers, and abdominal distress).

Immunosuppressant Medications - Since zinc supports immune function, it should not be taken with corticosteroids, cyclosporine, or other medications intended to suppress the immune system.

Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) - Zinc interacts with NSAIDs and could reduce the absorption and effectiveness of these medications. Examples of NSAIDs, which help to reduce pain and inflammation, include ibuprofen, naprosyn, piroxicam, and indomethacin.

Penicillamine - This medication, used to treat Wilson's disease (excessive amounts of copper that accumulate in the brain, liver, kidney, and eyes) and rheumatoid arthritis, decreases zinc levels.
 


Possible Interactions with: L-Glutamine
Also listed as: Glutamine; L-glutamine

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use glutamine supplements without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Cancer Therapy - Glutamine may increase the effectiveness and reduce the side effects of chemotherapy treatments with doxorubicin, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil in people with colon cancer. Similarly, preliminary studies suggest that glutamine supplements may prevent nerve damage associated with a medication called paclitaxel, used for breast and other types of cancers.

However, test tube studies suggest that glutamine may actually stimulate growth of tumors. Much more research is needed before it is known whether it is safe to use glutamine if you have cancer.
 


Possible Interactions with: Deglycyrrhizinated Licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) (root)
Also listed as: Glycyrrhiza glabra; Licorice; Spanish Licorice; Sweet Root

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use licorice without first talking to your healthcare provider:

Ace-inhibitors and diuretics - If you are taking angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or diuretics (except potassium-sparing diuretics) to regulate blood pressure, do not use licorice products. Licorice could interfere with the effectiveness of these medications or could worsen possible side effects.

Aspirin - Animal studies suggest that licorice may reduce stomach irritation as well as the risk of stomach ulcers associated with aspirin.

Digoxin - Because licorice may dangerously increase the risk of toxic effects from digoxin, this herb should not be taken with this medication.

Corticosteroids - Licorice may increase the effects of corticosteroid medications. You should consult with your doctor before using licorice with any corticosteroids.

Insulin - Licorice may enhance some of the adverse effects of insulin.

Laxatives - Licorice may cause substantial potassium loss in people taking stimulant laxatives.

Oral contraceptives - There have been reports of women developing high blood pressure and low potassium levels when they took licorice while on oral contraceptives. Therefore, you should avoid licorice if you are taking birth control medications.
 


Possible Interactions with: Artichoke (Cynara scolymus) (leaf)

While Artichoke has a low potential for toxic effects and overdose, it should be noted that in sensitive individuals there may be the potential for a possibly severe allergic reactions to occur.


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ALOREX - GLUTEN INTOLERANCE REMEDY

ALOREX - GLUTEN INTOLERANCE REMEDY

Comprehensive Formula for Celiac Disease Support.

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